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For the month of May, Wendy J. Dunn's The Light in the Labyrinth is just US$2.99 ($3.99 in Australia). See more information either here, or on Amazon.

Wendy J. Dunn

Sandra Worth

Mark Lichterman

Science and History

Science and History

Science and History

Reader review: The Light in the Labyrinth

"This is a lovely book. It’s beautifully written and makes history accessible to young adults in an engaging and interesting way. The book is satisfying on all kinds of levels. It brings history alive and validates for girls stepping into a woman’s role that they’re not alone as they wrestle with issues that women and girls have confronted through the ages, mainly love,and their place in a world controlled by men. Dr. Dunn is a very talented writer and the subject she’s written about is clearly close to her heart. She brings the history and characters alive for the reader, and even though I was just checking this book out as a gift for my young niece, I got so involved in the story that I read it from cover to cover. Highly recommended."

The Light in the Labyrinth on Amazon

The Serpent, the Horse, and Other Incidents


D.L. Major's new collection of short stories,  The Serpent, the Horse, and Other Incidents, is here. It's a set of nine short stories with both feet firmly in the world of magical realism, with big nods to steampunk, mythpunk and alternate histories.
Amazon has both the paperback and the Kindle version. The Epub version will happen soon.

All of the stories are also on DLM's site, so they can be read there as well:


If you happen to feel motivated to leave any kind of review for the book anywhere on the webs, please send DLM a message so he can either bathe in the glory or run and hide! In either event, information is a good thing...  

The Light in the Labyrinth

 

by Wendy J. Dunn


A Queen fights for her life.
A King denies his heart and soul.
A girl faces her true identity.
All things must come to an end
— all things but love.



Available in paperback and Kindle formats.
ISBN 978-0980721928

May 2015 Special


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OWTPOO2?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=B00OWTPOO2&linkCode=xm2&tag=kalpre-20



IN THE WINTER OF 1535, fourteen-year-old Kate Carey wants to escape her family home. She thinks her life will be so much better with Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII’s second wife and the aunt she idolises. Little does Kate know that by going to attend Anne Boleyn she will discover love and a secret that will shake the very foundations of her identity.  As an attendant to Anne Boleyn, Kate is swept up in events that see her witness her aunt’s darkest days. By the time winter ends, Kate will be changed forever. 


Wendy J. Dunn

Wendy J. Dunn is an Australian writer who has been obsessed by Anne Boleyn and Tudor History since she was ten-years-old. She is the author of two Tudor novels: Dear Heart, How Like You This?, the winner of the 2003 Glyph Fiction Award and 2004 runner up in the Eric Hoffer Award for Commercial Fiction, and The Light in the Labyrinth, her first young adult novel.

While she continues to have a very close and spooky relationship with Sir Thomas Wyatt, the elder (Tom told the story of Anne Boleyn in Dear Heart, How Like You This?), serendipity of life now leaves her no longer wondering if she has been channeling Anne Boleyn and Sir Tom for years in her writing, but considering the possibility of ancestral memory. Her own family tree reveals the intriguing fact that her ancestors – possibly over three generations – had purchased land from both the Boleyn and Wyatt families to build up their own holdings. It seems very likely Wendy’s ancestors knew the Wyatts and Boleyns personally.

Born in Melbourne, Australia, Wendy is married and the mother of three sons and one daughter — named after a certain Tudor queen, surprisingly, not Anne.

After successfully completing her MA (Writing) at Swinburne University Wendy became a tutor for the same course. She gained her PhD (Human Society) in 2014.

Web: www.wendyjdunn.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/authorwendyjdunn

Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/author/show/197156.Wendy_J_Dunn

Reader Reviews

The Light in the Labyrinth is the compelling story of a teenager who witnesses the final days of Anne Boleyn, the tragic second wife of Henry VIII. Young adults will be enthralled by the romance and political suspense swirling around the court of the notorious Henry VIII, and they will fall in love with Queen Anne in Dunn’s wonderful retelling of her tragic story.” ~ Sandra Worth, author of the award-winning Rose of York trilogy.
“…The Light in the Labyrinth is quite the read – no matter the age of the reader. And yes, thanks to Kate, a new voice has been added to the well-known haunting melody – a voice that mellows and matures as the story evolves and yet retains a touch of bittersweet innocence right to the bloody, inevitable end.” ~ Anna Belfrage for The ReviewRead full review here.
“It is exactly the type of novel that draws youth into a life-long love of history”. ~ QAB Book Review. Read full review here.
“I will be passing this novel on to my 14 year-old daughter and will be heartily recommending it to friends, family and anyone who loves a good historical novel. It is the perfect first historical fiction read for the teen in your life, but make sure you read it too!” ~ Claire Ridgway of The Anne Boleyn Files. Read Claire’s full review here.

5 stars! "This is a lovely book. It’s beautifully written and makes history accessible to young adults in an engaging and interesting way. The book is satisfying on all kinds of levels. It brings history alive and validates for girls stepping into a woman’s role that they’re not alone as they wrestle with issues that women and girls have confronted through the ages, mainly love,and their place in a world controlled by men." ~ History Lover.

5 stars! “Lively, touching and vivid, this novel offers a fresh and unusual perspective on one of history’s most well-known stories, the downfall of Anne Boleyn, by telling it through the eyes of young Kate Carey, Anne’s niece” ~ Sophie Masson.

5 stars! "I was not prepared to cry at the end–cry because it had ended, because it ended on a note of sadness and betrayal and because it brought Anne Boleyn to life in a bold new light. But I cried for more than just Queen Anne. I cried for Kate, for the loss of innocence and trust, for the betrayals of and by people she loved most, and for bravery that marked the death of youth as much as it marked the death of her colourful aunt." ~ Linda Root.

4 stars!  "This is a quality Y/A book, that an adult can enjoy. In fact, I found it better researched & written than many adult books of this subject. Young Katherine’s tale is moving and “Aunt Nan” is one of the most complex characterisation of Queen Anne Boleyn I’ve read." ~ Patricia Hain.

A discussion between Sandra Worth and Wendy J. Dunn.

 

Sandra is the author of the Rose of York trilogy, comprising of Love & War, Crown of Destiny, and Fall from Grace.


Fellow historical writer Wendy J. Dunn is the author of Dear Heart, How Like You This? and The Light in the Labyrinth.

Metropolis ink is proud to have published prize-winning novels by these two fine writers. In the following discussion, Sandra and Wendy cover the process of writing, research, and, of course, Richard III...


Wendy: Congratulations, Sandra, on your continued success as an award-winning author. Can you please tell us about your fourth novel, The Lady of Roses, which is reviewed on my site?

Sandra: Thank you, Wendy. This is a sort of prequel to my debut novel, The Rose of York: Love & War. It opens in 1456, five years before the setting of Love & War, with young Isobel Ingoldesthorpe, a ward of the Lancastrian queen, Margaret of Anou leaving an abbey in the north to go to court, where she hopes to make a marriage based on love.
      Along the way, she meets and falls in love with John Neville, Lord Montagu, brother of the Yorkist leader, Warwick the Kingmaker, who leads the rebellion against her guardian, the Lancastrian queen. It’s an impossible match, but somehow these two young lovers from enemy camps manage to wed. The book covers the history of the period through the prism of Isobel’s life with John Neville. And thank goodness they did marry, because both FDR and Churchill wouldn’t have been here to save us from Hitler otherwise!

Wendy: Your award winning novels (Love and War, Crown of Destiny, Fall From Grace) recounted the story of Richard III.  You are obviously a passionate advocate for this King of England. What was the pivotal moment that first drew you to him?

Sandra: When I saw his portrait at the National Portrait Gallery. I couldn’t believe this handsome young man was Shakepeare’s hump-backed villain! According to the entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica that I read on my return, Richard III was a justician and his brief reign held great promise for the future. That sent  me researching, I had to know the truth, and the more read, the more difficult it was to reconcile the man with the myth, the actions of Richard’s life with his reputation in history. Modern historians agree that the origin of Richard villainy lies in Tudor propaganda. The problem is that by the end of the sixteenth century, Tudor propaganda had become historical fact.

Wendy: Why do you think Richard continues to arouse so much passion for readers and writers?

Sandra: It’s the injustice, I think. The cry for justice is eternal, and that’s what drew me to him. Henry Tudor, a lucky adventurer with a flimsy claim to the throne, won the crown and justified his usurpation by maligning the last monarch of the valiant line of kings that had ruled England for four hundred years. Richard III was an honorable man, a devoted husband, and a king who cared for his people. He sacrificed his base of political support to bring justice to the common man. But the victor writes history, and the Tudors are a prime example of that. If Hitler had won World War II, what would FDR and Churchill’s reputation be today?

Wendy: Richard is known by many as the king who murdered his two young nephews. What would you say to someone who is convinced of Richard’s guilt?

Sandra: Let’s look at the facts. There is no evidence a murder was ever committed, and all that is known for sure is that the princes disappeared. What people forget is that Richard III had three young little princes standing between him and the throne, not just two. This would be the orphaned son of his older brother Clarence, Edward, Earl of Warwick.  Why murder two little princes, and not the third? If Richard III were the villain the Tudors claimed, he wouldn’t have hesitated to murder this child. But Richard welcomed his little nephew into his household and cared for him lovingly. It was Henry Tudor who executed him. He imprisoned the eleven year old Edward, Earl of Warwick in the Tower of London as soon as he won Bosworth. The boy lived in captivity there for thirteen years, until Henry VII finally brought him out to be beheaded on the block.
     Back to the two little princes: A case can be made that Richard III sent them abroad for safety’s sake before Bosworth, and one survived. There is some evidence that the Pretender who fought Henry VII for the crown may have indeed been who he claimed– the younger prince, Richard of York. In that case, Henry Tudor put to death the true King of England at Tyburn. This is a subject covered in my forthcoming novel, THE KING’S DAUGHTER: A NOVEL OF THE FIRST TUDOR QUEEN, due out in December.

Wendy: You do intensive research for your work. What kind of research is important to you?

Sandra: For me, reading is the most vital element. Talking with scholars also illuminates this murky period, and handwriting analysis has provided me with insights I might never have had into the character and personality of those I write about. I find that examining their personal items — things that were important to them, like their books — and visiting the battlefields, castles and churches associated with them helps to give me a real sense of who they were, and what was important to them.

Wendy: Do you continue to research as you write the story?

Sandra: Absolutely. As long as the manuscript is in my hands, I’m open to revising as information makes itself available.

Wendy: William Styron once said “While it may be satisfying and advantageous for historians to feast on rich archival material, the writer of historical fiction is better off when past events have left him with short rations.”  What do you think? Does this boil down to an author’s own preference, that intensive research and “short rations” can equally provide the soil for the growth of a successful novel?

Sandra: The “short rations” came in handy when I was writing LADY OF THE ROSES! Very little is known about Isobel and this dark period in which she lived, so I was able to bring my own motivations and  interpretation to the story. The long blanks allowed me to be more creative with her story than with any other I have written to date, which was a lovely experience for me. What makes writing historicals difficult is flushing out the story around a great deal of known material. Not everyone feels the facts are as sacrosanct as I do. I’ve chosen not to stray from the known historical record, and only to emphasize the passions of those whose actions ruled the destiny of a nation, and changed the course of history.

Wendy: You live in America. Do you find that frustrating when it comes to writing books drawn from English history?

Sandra: Not really because I spent ten years researching the era and made a dozen Ricardian trips to England and Bruges examining the surviving data. That was enormously helpful. Of course, living in the U.S., you can’t just pack up and make a trip to a castle you’re writing about. Instead, you have to collect all the question marks, put them in one sack, and plan a trip that will hopefully give you the answers you seek once you’re there. The only way it could be helpful to live on this side of the pond and write about the other, is that it you’re not constrained. You owe fealty to none but yourself, and what you see as the truth.

Wendy: Can you please tell us why you decided to write about Elizabeth of York?

Sandra: It was a natural progression. She ended my Rose of York trilogy in an epilogue and I received emails inquiring about her. Evidently readers wanted to know more. When I researched the fiction, I found that she was a forgotten queen, and nothing had been written on her for nearly fifty years. Yet she was a remarkable woman and had a dramatic life. She needed her story told.

Visit Sandra’s website:  www.sandraworth.com
Vist Wendy's website: wendyjdunn.com

Shiver Test

Shiver Test cover 750

Fifteen poems set to music
by White Rabbit


  [clearboth]  [hr]

Tracks



  1. The City of Yes and the City of No
    Yevgeny Yevtushenko

  2. In the Beginning
    Dylan Thomas

  3. When I Have FearsJohn Keats

  4. Spell of Creation
    Kathleen Raine

  5. The Transitional Man
    Sarah Gale

  6. The Tyger
    William Blake

  7. Lament of the Frontier Guard
    Ezra Pound

  8. Silence
    Judith Wright

  9. Chaos
    Chris Wallace-Crabbe

  10. Boundary Conditions
    Gwen Harwood

  11. As Kingfishers Catch Fire
    Gerard Manley-Hopkins

  12. The Ikons
    James K. Baxter

  13. Full Moon Rhyme
    Judith Wright

  14. The Eye of the Angel
    Henry Miller

  15. Beach HouseJames K. Baxter

[hr]

Where to get the album

Download (MP3)



Physical CD



[hr]

The digital version of Shiver Test can be downloaded from CD Baby. The tracks can be previewed here:

cdbaby_tracklist





A Man's Guide to Babies


by John Zakour


ISBN 9780957952850
80 pages
$9.95


 

THIS BOOK IS A FUN GUIDE for a man who is about to become a dad. It is written by a man, for men, in easy-to-understand (i.e. small) words. The book is relatively short because as a man, the author realizes that men have better things to do than spend their time reading a book.

The author wrote this book because when he was first learning to deal with his new-born son, he was pretty much a big confused lug. He had no idea what to do. He's still a big lug, but is not quite as confused. By writing this book he hopes to share his wisdom with other men, and let them know that they are not alone in their confusion. Like they say, there is safety in numbers.





 

Where to buy


 


[hr]


CONTENTS





  • General baby info

  • The baby's room

  • The birth

  • Naming hints

  • Baby stages

  • What babies think

  • Crying

  • Feeding

  • Formula feeding

  • Diapers

  • Getting baby to sleep

  • Holding

  • Dressng

  • Bathing

  • Spitting Up

  • Teething

  • Baby Toys

  • Talking to the baby

  • Baby sign language

  • The sick baby

  • Daycare

  • Finding a sitter

  • Things to remember

  • Baby facts

  • Development

 

JOHN ZAKOUR




john zakourJOHN is a humor writer with a Master’s degree in Human Behavior. He has written zillions (well, thousands) of gags for syndicated comics and comedians (including Marmaduke, Rugrats, Grimmy, and Dennis the Menace, and Joan Rivers’ old TV show). John’s humorous SF book, The Plutonium Blonde (DAW, 2001, co-written with Larry Ganem), was named one of the top 30 SF books of 2001 by The Chronicle of Science Fiction. His second novel, The Doomsday Brunette (DAW, Feb. 2004), has made the Locus best seller’s list. John’s humorous look at pregnancy, A Man’s Guide To Pregnancy, is published by Metropolis Ink and selling well at Motherhood Maternity stores all over the country and in Canada.

John is also a regular contributor to Nickelodeon magazine writing Fairly Odd Parents and Jimmy Neutron stories. John has written three books on HTML (for Waite Press) and a number of children’s books for a book packager. He’s also sold hundreds of greeting cards to Hallmark, Recycled Paper Products, Gibson, and many others. John has sold two screenplays: “Saucer Girls” to Plutonium Films (though he’s sure it won’t ever get made) and the short feature “A Date with Death” that is being produced in England. John has also written and helped develop an animated series called “Prime Squad” for MUV Technologies in India. John was also a multiple-time finalist in the America’s Best Screenplay contest in three different divisions.

John lives in upstate New York with his wife, Olga, a professor at Cornell University, and his son, Jay. Back in the old days (the late 1990s) John worked as science writer/web guru for Cornell University. In the 1980s John was a freelance computer game programmer. John has also been an EMT and a judo instructor. He’s flexible and fast. Currently, just for fun, John is working on his Ph.D. in holistic nutrition. For fun John also enjoys the martial arts, softball, and just relaxing and watching TV.

[hr]

EXTRACT


 

Preparing for the Baby to Come Home


 

Before your wife comes home with your new little bundle of joy it’s best you make sure you have certain items on hand, since once the baby arrives, your house will be more chaotic than a bunch of hungry fat people rushing an all-you-can-eat buffet that’s closing in five minutes. In other words, this time before your child arrives will be your last moments of calm—the calm before the storm. Use this time well by preparing for everything. Just follow this handy list and you should be okay.


  • Baby powder (to dry baby)

  • Wet wipes (to wet baby—yes, it’s a vicious cycle)

  • Extra diapers (you can never have enough)

  • Lots of frozen food (for you—your wife won’t be in the mood to cook for awhile)

  • Baby soap (yep, they have special soap)

  • Baby shampoo (even if they don’t have hair)

  • A good book (gives you something to read while your wife is too tired to have sex)

  • Onesees (they are kind of like shirts and pants for little babies; they come in surprisingly handy. Get the newborn size.)

  • More sheets and crib liners (babies have a tendency to spit up over and over again)

  • Baby acetaminophen (you may want to want buy stock in the company)

  • A year’s supply of paper towels (you’ll probably use them in a week)

NOTE: This list assumes that you have read the part on preparing a baby’s room and already have such items in the house as a crib, changing table, baby toys, and the basic room items. If you don’t have these already, now would be a good time to get them, ’cause—trust me—you don’t want to be putting a crib together (reading instructions in Chinese) with a sleep- deprived wife and a crying baby looking over your shoulder.

 

Baby Stages


 

Babies actually go through numerous physical and mental stages during the first year of their lives. But for the purposes of this book I will only define four very general stages.

 

The newborn. This is a baby in its first month of life. The newborn looks confused most of the time, and rightly so. Heck, it just left a nice warm womb and was thrust on the world—quite a shock. This baby looks at you pretty much the same way it would a toaster

 

The not newborn/not mobile baby. This baby can’t crawl yet, so it’s still totally dependent on you for it to get around (which is good, ’cause that way you should always know where he or she is). It’s starting to figure out the world. Later on in this stage this baby can sit on its own and even smile. It can tell the difference between you and a toaster. It actually prefers your company to a lot of things. (Of course it will prefer your wife’s company to yours, but you can’t blame it for having taste.) The baby may even start to speak a few words here

 

The crawler. This is when the baby first becomes mobile and starts to sense a bit of freedom. This baby is pretty much aware of you and the world. In fact, this baby may try to get away from you from time to time. Don’t take it personally (you probably don’t need to start bathing more); babies just need their space too. The baby will probably add a few words to its vocabulary.

 

The walker. (well, the walker and faller) This baby will stand on his or her own two feet and start to move by walking. The baby is very aware of the world and starting to figure out its place in it and therefore your place in it. Sometimes the baby’s idea of its place and your place are going to collide, and you will have disagreements, which may lead to tantrums. Hopefully these will be limited to the baby and be short. Babies like order and to know who the boss is. They wish it were them, and will test your limits, but you need to be strong. Chances are pretty good you are still bigger than them at this stage so you should be okay. The baby will probably say some more words now and understand a whole lot of words.





REVIEWS


 

5stars
Reader review


 

This book is a fun gift for any new or soon to be new dad. It's meant to give them a laugh, a smile and a hint or two. It's great for showing them they are not alone in their confusion about babies.



LINKS


 

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Working Daze



by John Zakour

and Kyle Miller


ISBN 978-0975126479
125 pages
$8.95


 

THIS BOOK IS MOSTLY CARTOONS from the comic panel Working Daze, which is syndicated in a few lucky papers and over the web. We call this book an extended cartoon collection because it also adds a few witticisms and handy hints here and there, just to be different.
      Working Daze highlights (well, mostly skews) the trials and tribulations we all go through in our daily work lives when dealing with a group of individuals and a corporate “mind set.” It doesn’t take place in your office, but sometimes you swear it does.
     This book was inspired by managers and management everywhere. If you’ve ever been managed by anybody or managed anybody, you should be able to relate to it. Managers aren’t inheritably evil, though they often appear that way—it just happens that managers are usually more clueless and helpless than anything else.
     When life gets tough, sometimes our only defense is to sit back, relax, and laugh at it a little. That’s where these cartoons come in; hopefully they will give you a little laugh or a smile—maybe even make you say to yourself: Yep, that’s how it works!

PAPERBACK


 




SAMPLE BITS


 

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JOHN ZAKOUR & KYLE MILLER




JOHN is a humor writer with a Master’s degree in Human Behavior. He has written zillions (well, thousands) of gags for syndicated comics and comedians (including Marmaduke, Rugrats, Grimmy, and Dennis the Menace, and Joan Rivers’ old TV show). John’s humorous SF book, The Plutonium Blonde (DAW, 2001, co-written with Larry Ganem), was named one of the top 30 SF books of 2001 by The Chronicle of Science Fiction. His second novel, The Doomsday Brunette (DAW, Feb. 2004), has made the Locus best seller’s list. John’s humorous look at pregnancy, A Man’s Guide To Pregnancy, is published by Metropolis Ink and selling well at Motherhood Maternity stores all over the country and in Canada.

John is also a regular contributor to Nickelodeon magazine writing Fairly Odd Parents and Jimmy Neutron stories. John has written three books on HTML (for Waite Press) and a number of children’s books for a book packager. He’s also sold hundreds of greeting cards to Hallmark, Recycled Paper Products, Gibson, and many others. John has sold two screenplays: “Saucer Girls” to Plutonium Films (though he’s sure it won’t ever get made) and the short feature “A Date with Death” that is being produced in England. John has also written and helped develop an animated series called “Prime Squad” for MUV Technologies in India. John was also a multiple-time finalist in the America’s Best Screenplay contest in three different divisions.

John lives in upstate New York with his wife, Olga, a professor at Cornell University, and his son, Jay. Back in the old days (the late 1990s) John worked as science writer/web guru for Cornell University. In the 1980s John was a freelance computer game programmer. John has also been an EMT and a judo instructor. He’s flexible and fast. Currently, just for fun, John is working on his Ph.D. in holistic nutrition. For fun John also enjoys the martial arts, softball, and just relaxing and watching TV.

 

When he’s not drawing cartoons, Working Daze co-author KYLE MILLER makes his living as a game designer. He may be best known for his work on Toon, The Cartoon Role-playing Game for Steve Jackson Games. While there, he also worked on Car Wars, GURPS, OGRE, Illuminati and Isaac Asimov’s Star Frontiers. Kyle was the sole designer and creative influence for the best selling 3D Ultra pinball series for Sierra games, which includes five titles for the PC, Macintosh, and the Gameboy. In addition to drawing cartoons and making games (too many to mention here) Kyle has also held jobs at a toy store, movie theatre, and even the Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Kyle currently makes his home near Chicago, Illinois, where he lives with his wife of 18 years, his two children, and their dog (otherwise known as the fur distribution system). Kyle has heard many stories about spare time and is very interested in acquiring some for personal use.

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LINKS


 

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